ML Parker is a professional photographer, videographer, writer, and adventurer. 

Whether I'm working with scientists in the field or folks in the outdoor industry, I use vibrant visuals and compelling writing to promote adventurous spirits, diligence, and discovery.

My photos capture remarkable moments. A snowy summit at sunrise. A blistered hand clutching a rope. A discerning look from a sea turtle.

My videos motivate movement. How does it feel to run 60 miles through rugged, mountain terrain? What is it like to handle a shark with your bare hands?  How does a balloon reach the stratosphere?  

My writing offers deeper understanding. How is the seismic activity of a volcano similar to heart palpitations in the human body? Why is gainful employment so critical to mental health? What can a marine biologist learn from a fisherman

 Enjoying a taste of alpine life in the Cascades 

Enjoying a taste of alpine life in the Cascades 

Over the past five years, I have worked with a wide variety of scientists. I have written, filmed, and photographed over 100 stories on topics including seismology, astronomy, biology, oceanography, psychology, marine ecology, coastal geomorphology, public health, organic chemistry, and cancer treatments. I have accompanied research teams on expeditions as close as the Outer Banks of North Carolina and as far away as the Antarctic Peninsula. 

In addition to documenting the wonderful world of science, I am drawn to stories and activities that highlight human grit, tenacity, and endurance. I enjoy capturing the physical and mental journeys of ultra-marathon runners, rock climbers, mountaineers, and anyone else who loves adventuring in wild places. 


When members of the media are in the field, they must balance getting information (interviews, photographs) with keeping out of the researchers’ way as they conduct their work. This strikes me as very difficult, and I have heard stories about other videographers not being able to make the cut. We never felt that way about Mary Lide. She was part of the team, and her presence was a contribution rather than an interference.
Mary Lide was up for anything - whether it was driving across the New Mexico desert at night, eating rattlesnake, waking up at 2am to take pictures of a balloon launch, or sitting inside a half-inflated solar balloon on a basketball court. Her enthusiasm and flexibility helped bring our research to life.
— Danny Bowman, Senior Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories

 On the summit of Mt. Shasta, the second-tallest peak in the Cascade Range at 14,180 feet.  |  Photo by Jon Haas 

On the summit of Mt. Shasta, the second-tallest peak in the Cascade Range at 14,180 feet.  |  Photo by Jon Haas